Quick Answer: How Did Waitangi Get Its Name?

What are the main points of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Treaty of WaitangiThe Waitangi Sheet of the Treaty of WaitangiContextTreaty to establish a British Governor of New Zealand, consider Māori ownership of their lands and other properties, and give Māori the rights of British subjects.Signed6 February 18406 more rows.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

Who was against the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia NgākutiTāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi.

What really happened at Waitangi?

Waitangi: What Really Happened (2011) A dramatization of the days leading up to 6 February 1840 when the gathered Maori leaders signed the Treaty of Waitangi, told in recreations and interviews with the participants and locals.

What food is eaten on Waitangi Day?

WAITANGI DAY KI OKAHU There will be food stalls aplenty serving up kai Māori (hāngī, kaimoana, fry bread), plus sausage sizzles, burgers and barbecue, among other delicacies.

How do you pronounce Waitangi?

waitangi Pronunciation. wai·t·an·gi.

What went wrong with the Treaty of Waitangi?

The land was lost through a combination of private and Government purchases, outright confiscation, and Native Land Court practices that made it difficult for Māori to maintain their land under traditional ownership structures. There were some purchases of Māori land made before the Treaty was signed.

What was in the Treaty of Waitangi?

In the English version, Māori cede the sovereignty of New Zealand to Britain; Māori give the Crown an exclusive right to buy lands they wish to sell, and, in return, are guaranteed full rights of ownership of their lands, forests, fisheries and other possessions; and Māori are given the rights and privileges of British …

What Waitangi Day means to me?

Waitangi Day means to me, it kind of brings everyone together, Maori and non-Maori, and we get to share our [Maori] culture. … It’s a day that Maori get to celebrate their culture . . . it’s a time we lose our negative names and get to shine on the positive bits of our culture.

What is the meaning of Aotearoa?

AOTEAROA. Aotearoa is the Maori name for New Zealand, though it seems at first to have been used for the North Island only.

How do you pronounce Aotearoa?

Longman Pronunciation Dictionary recommends the pronunciation with /iː. ər/ (so not even /ɪər/ but /iː. ər/, disyllabic!)

What has Waitangi Day become to some people since the 1970’s?

The Waitangi Day Act 1960 declared 6 February to be Waitangi Day; a national day of thanksgiving in commemoration of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. Waitangi Day, a public holiday from 1974, briefly became New Zealand Day in the 1970s. Increasingly, it became a focus for Māori protest activities.

What does Waitangi mean?

There are several possible meanings for ‘Waitangi’ – it literally translates as ‘noisy or weeping water. ‘ Reed’s Place Names of New Zealand notes that the literal meaning of the Waitangi in the Bay of Islands may refer to the noise of Haruru Falls at the mouth of the Waitangi River.

Why was the Treaty of Waitangi created?

The purpose of the Treaty was to enable the British settlers and the Māori people to live together in New Zealand under a common set of laws or agreements. The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

What is Waitangi Day and why do we celebrate it?

Waitangi Day (Māori: Te Rā o Waitangi), the national day of New Zealand, marks the anniversary of the initial signing – on 6 February 1840 – of the Treaty of Waitangi, which is regarded as the founding document of the nation.

Why the Treaty of Waitangi is important?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected. … requiring the Government to act reasonably and in good faith towards Māori.

How does the Treaty of Waitangi affect us today?

The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori. It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living. It is important that Māori and non-Māori who live near each other are considerate of each other and respect each other’s differences.

What is the Treaty of Waitangi Day?

6 FebruaryEvery year on 6 February, New Zealand marks the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840. In that year, representatives of the British Crown and over 500 Māori chiefs signed what is often considered to be New Zealand’s founding document.