What Was New Zealand Like When The Treaty Was Signed?

What did the British do to New Zealand?

Whalers, missionaries, and traders followed, and in 1840 Britain formally annexed the islands and established New Zealand’s first permanent European settlement at Wellington..

Why did New Zealand leave the British Empire?

Because government troops were provided by the British government, the New Zealand government couldn’t take over responsibility for Māori affairs until it provided its own military. It did this from 1864, leading to more independence from Britain.

When did the British invade New Zealand?

October 1769It would be 127 years before the next recorded encounter between European and Māori. The British explorer James Cook arrived in Poverty Bay in October 1769. His voyage to the south Pacific was primarily a scientific expedition, but the British were not averse to expanding trade and empire.

How was the Treaty of Waitangi changed New Zealand?

It also gave the Crown a right to deal with Māori in buying land. The English version gave chiefs ‘exclusive and undisturbed possession’ of lands, forests, fisheries and other property. It also gave the Crown an exclusive right to deal with Māori over buying land.

What happened after Treaty of Waitangi?

What happened after the Treaty was signed? Shortly after the Treaty was signed, Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson proclaimed British sovereignty over the whole of New Zealand. … Under British law, New Zealand became technically a part of the colony of New South Wales.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important in research studies being conducted in NZ?

The Treaty of Waitangi marked the foundation of the modern state of New Zealand and formalised a relationship between the British Crown and Māori to recognise and protect Māori values, traditions and practices (Cram 2003, 10).

Is the Treaty of Waitangi a source of law in New Zealand?

Increasingly, New Zealand’s constitution reflects the Treaty of Waitangi as a founding document of government in New Zealand. The Constitution Act 1986 is a key formal statement of New Zealand’s system of government, in particular the executive, legislature and the judiciary.

Where was the treaty signed in New Zealand?

Bay of IslandsThe Treaty of Waitangi was signed on February 6, 1840, at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands. Forty-three Northland Chiefs signed the treaty on that day. Over 500 Māori Chiefs signed it as it was taken around the country during the next eight months.

What happened in 1840 in NZ?

1840 is considered a watershed year in the history of New Zealand: The Treaty of Waitangi is signed, British sovereignty over New Zealand is proclaimed, organised European settlement begins, and Auckland and Wellington are both founded.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi so important?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected.

How was the Treaty of Waitangi affect us today?

The Treaty was a contract of respect between the British and Māori. Today, there are a lot of people living here whose families are not from Britain. The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

Who was against the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840. Most chiefs signed a Māori-language version of the treaty.

Which Chiefs did not sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi. Tāraia was a famous warrior and may have felt that signing would be beneath him.

What happened before the Treaty of Waitangi was signed?

The history of Māori migration and settlement in Aotearoa and the stories of Te Ao Māori (The Māori World) have been retained in the oral histories of each iwi (tribe) and hapu (sub-tribe). Histories of the Māori people are told in the creation stories.

When was the New Zealand treaty signed?

6 February 1840Gathering signatures from around the country. About 40 chiefs signed the Treaty of Waitangi on 6 February 1840.

Why did Britain want a treaty with New Zealand?

The British convinced the native Maori people to sign the Treaty of Waitangi, stating that New Zealand would belong to the crown of England. … Maori chiefs were motivated by a desire for protection from foreign powers, and to allow for wider settlement that would increase trade and prosperity for them.

Why was a treaty needed in New Zealand?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. The Treaty promised to protect Māori culture and to enable Māori to continue to live in New Zealand as Māori. …