Why Is The Concept Of The Principles Of The Treaty Of Waitangi Problematic?

Is New Zealand stolen land?

The New Zealand land confiscations took place during the 1860s to punish the Kingitanga movement for attempting to set up an alternative, Māori, form of government that forbade the selling of land to European settlers.

Much of the land that was never occupied by settlers was later sold by the Crown..

Why are the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi so important?

The Treaty of Waitangi principle puts students at the centre of teaching and learning, asserting that they should experience a curriculum that engages and challenges them, is forward-looking and inclusive, and affirms New Zealand’s unique identity.”

What are the main principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The principles of partnership, participation and protection underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi fair?

Colonists believed the Treaty of Waitangi was fair because it offered Māori the rights of British citizens. The signing of the Treaty made it easier for settlers to acquire land. … Pākehā took sides with Māori and were known as ‘philo-Māori’ or Pākehā–Māori.

Who did not sign treaties?

Tāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi. Tāraia was a famous warrior and may have felt that signing would be beneath him.

Why is Article Three of the Treaty of Waitangi important to Māori health?

The Queen will protect all the Māori people of New Zealand, and give them all the same rights as those of the people of England. Oritetanga – Article 3 contains a provision which guarantees equality between Māori individuals and other New Zealanders.

How does the Treaty of Waitangi affect us today?

The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori. It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living. It is important that Māori and non-Māori who live near each other are considerate of each other and respect each other’s differences.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi promise?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. … The Treaty promised to protect Māori culture and to enable Māori to continue to live in New Zealand as Māori.

What happened after the Treaty of Waitangi?

What happened after the Treaty was signed? Shortly after the Treaty was signed, Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson proclaimed British sovereignty over the whole of New Zealand. … Under British law, New Zealand became technically a part of the colony of New South Wales.

What was the problem with the Treaty of Waitangi?

The land was lost through a combination of private and Government purchases, outright confiscation, and Native Land Court practices that made it difficult for Māori to maintain their land under traditional ownership structures. There were some purchases of Māori land made before the Treaty was signed.

What does Article 2 of the Treaty of Waitangi mean?

Article Two Māori agreed to give the Crown a right to deal with them over land transactions. English: confirmed and guaranteed to the chiefs ‘exclusive and undisturbed possession of their lands and estates, forests, fisheries, and other properties’.

What is taonga mean?

Taonga (taoka in South Island Māori) is a Māori language word which refers to a treasured possession in Māori culture. … Intangible examples may include language and spiritual beliefs.

Was the Treaty of Waitangi successful?

Around 530 to 540 Māori, at least 13 of them women, signed the Māori language version of the Treaty of Waitangi, despite some Māori leaders cautioning against it. An immediate result of the treaty was that Queen Victoria’s government gained the sole right to purchase land.

Why did the Treaty of Waitangi happen?

Reasons why chiefs signed the treaty included wanting controls on sales of Māori land to Europeans, and on European settlers. They also wanted to trade with Europeans, and believed the new relationship with Britain would stop fighting between tribes.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi mean?

The Treaty of Waitangi ( Te Tiriti o Waitangi) is an important agreement that was signed by representatives of the British Crown and Māori in 1840. The purpose of the Treaty was to enable the British settlers and the Māori people to live together in New Zealand under a common set of laws or agreements.